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Hiroyuki Sanada, Ryan Reynolds, Director Daniel Espinosa, Olga Dihovichnaya, Rebecca Ferguson, Ariyon Bakare  and Jake Gyllenhaal seen at Columbia Pictures World Premiere of "Life" the movie at SXSW 2017 on Saturday, March 18, 2017, in Austin, TX. (Photo by Eric Charbonneau/Invision for Sony Pictures/AP Images)

LIFE is Already Scary, Now It’s A Scarier Reynolds & Gyllenhaal Movie, Thanks

by Quendrith Johnson, Los Angeles Correspondent

What is it with ‘ripped from the alt-news headlines’ movie plots lately? KONG: SKULL ISLAND has a hollow earth slash reptilian b-story, even a CIA mind control “Monarch” reference on a briefcase. Now LIFE, starring Ryan Reynolds and Jake Gyllenhaal, has a waterborne microbe from Mars mass-extinction horror twist.

Ryan Reynolds and Jake Gyllenhaal seen at Columbia Pictures World Premiere of "Life" the movie at SXSW 2017 on Saturday, March 18, 2017, in Austin, TX. (Photo by Eric Charbonneau/Invision for Sony Pictures/AP Images)

Ryan Reynolds and Jake Gyllenhaal seen at Columbia Pictures World Premiere of “Life” the movie at SXSW 2017 on Saturday, March 18, 2017, in Austin, TX. [Photo by Eric Charbonneau/Invision for Sony Pictures/AP Images]

While scary stories about hostile life on Mars is a running theme since B-movies in the 50’s, this one has some actual science to back it up.

LIFE, directed by Daniel Espinosa, touts the fact that the producers and writers consulted with “astrobiologists and space medicine experts,” one of whom is Dr. Kevin Fong. “Space is an extreme environment, like any of the extreme environments we’ve attempted to conquer in the 20th century – deserts, polar ice caps, our highest mountains,” Fong explained. “What we know about extreme environments is that you can’t go there for long and it’s not without penalty. You come back literally less than the person you were.”

“It’s hard enough to stay alive up there on a routine mission when everything goes right.  When things start to go wrong, people start to die off pretty quickly.” These cheery words underscore his experience as an astrophysicist and MD who’s worked on NASA’s Human Adaptation and Countermeasures Office at Johnson Space Center in Houston, meaning he is a medical expert on keeping folks alive and kicking in space.

No offense to the astro-geniuses, but frankly movie stars can explain a movie better.

Cast and crew of "Life" seen at Columbia Pictures World Premiere of "Life" the movie at SXSW 2017 on Saturday, March 18, 2017, in Austin, TX. (Photo by Eric Charbonneau/Invision for Sony/AP Images)

Cast and crew of “Life” seen at Columbia Pictures World Premiere of “Life” the movie at SXSW 2017 on Saturday, March 18, 2017, in Austin, TX. (Photo by Eric Charbonneau/Invision for Sony/AP Images)

In typical Jake Gyllenhaal extreme-character mode, he plays International Space Station denizen David Jordan, who’s already clocked 473 days afloat in outer space. “It was a beautifully paced, terrifying script.  It’s a fun idea. You think you know where it’s going, and then it evolves into something where you really, really don’t,” he added. “The life form is literal, but it’s also an incredible metaphor for what can happen. Curiosity is one of the most important human traits, but I think searching too far can be full of hubris. In that way, the life form is a repercussion for that kind of curiosity.”

“My grandfather was a doctor,” Gyllenhaal shared, “and Daniel and I talked about the similarities in my character to my grandfather. It’s a bit of an homage to him.”

Next some newcomers join the freaky plot, and things get terrifying as a look for proof of life on Mars backfires. Naturally the movie includes a requisite CDC, Centers for Disease Control, rep. This one comes in the form of Rebecca Ferguson, as Miranda North. “Miranda is a microbiologist sent up to protect everyone on Earth from whatever this is that we find,” Ferguson explained.

Her character puts up some “firewalls” against extra-terrestrial contamination. “The firewall is, first, the container that the specimen was in.  And then the room.  And then the station itself.  She has to do whatever she can do to protect Earth, because we don’t know what this life form is.” No, it’s not a gimmicky ‘life form,’ either.

Producer Julie Lynn nailed it best on that front. “We didn’t want the life form to be a person in a suit or a puppet. We wanted it to be something that could evolve from a cellular piece, a tiny cell. It’s not that it comes out with an intent to do harm; it is its own creature, and it is affected by what happens to it.”

Paris, France - Monday March 13, 2017: Jake Gyllenhaal and Rebecca Ferguson at the Columbia Pictures "LIFE" Photo Call at The Planetarium of Le Grand Palais

Paris, France – Monday March 13, 2017: Jake Gyllenhaal and Rebecca Ferguson at the Columbia Pictures “LIFE” Photo Call at The Planetarium of Le Grand Palais

Rebecca Ferguson spins it as a relationship game with the pathogen. “We all have our own relationship to this creature. Some of us love it, we nurture it.  Some of us want to kill it off in the beginning.  And that creates an incredible tension in the group,” she said.

Ryan Reynolds rounds it out with, “this script had such a degree of reality and a feeling of constant tension,” that he reteamed with his DEADPOOL writing pals Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick, to ratchet up the stakes. Coincidentally, Reynolds also went back to the well with his SAFE HOUSE director Daniel Espinosa.

Having worked well with Reynolds, Espinosa is also super excited about LIFE. “I think the reason so many great directors have walked into science fiction is to work with the unknown — the fear or fascination with the unknown,” he said.  “We live in a world that is quite mundane, but in space, you enter an adventure – you don’t know how it looks, how it feels, what it can do to you, where it is. It doesn’t make a sound. That’s terrifying.”

Whatever the hell LIFE’s monster is in this case, the SAFE HOUSE director made it even scarier when he added that “this script felt more like a realistic science fiction. Maybe science reality.” Picture waking up ’50,000-year-old microbes’ inside crystalline hibernation on Mars, that is. Or, in movie critic shorthand, the DNA from amber plot device from Jurassic Park, but with super-freaky outer space Martian microbial goo meets Alien. Sorry for the gross oversimplification but this helps put your fears to rest, folks, because it’s only a movie. We hope. Alternative news purveyors might spin it as a doomsday scenario for planet Earth, lol. LIFE, go see it before it happens. It opens Mar. 24, brought to you by Skydance and SONY (Columbia).  Interestingly, Megan Ellison’s brother David Ellison is listed as a producer. The film has bowed in Berlin, Moscow, Paris, and at SXSW in Austin, Texas last week. [Most of the photos included are from SXSW premiere.] See their official website for showtimes and venues. Hahtag #LIFEMOVIE

Directed by:  

Daniel Espinosa

Written by:

Rhett Reese & Paul Wernick

Produced by:

David Ellison

Dana Goldberg

Bonnie Curtis

Julie Lynn

Executive Producers: 

Don Granger

Vicki Dee Rock

Cast:

Jake Gyllenhaal

Rebecca Ferguson

Ryan Reynolds

Hiroyuki Sanada

Ariyon Bakare

Olga Dihovichnaya

# # #

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Recap: What We Love About WGA (West & East), Oral History & Agency List

LOS ANGELES, CA (Jan. 5, 2017): Yesterday when The Writers Guild of America (WGA) released its Nominations list for 2016, for the 2017 WGA Awards presentation on Feb.19, and DEADPOOL’s adapted screenplay stood right alongside legendary playwright August Wilson’s opus Fences, it reminded everyone why the WGA is not only still relevant, but groundbreaking. The WGA recognizes that movie-writing is not playwriting, and that screenplays in all their ever-changing forms are what drive the stories we see on screen. Yes, Screenwriting, with a capital “s,” is its own art form.

Even though the Screen Actors Guild (SAG), the Directors Guild of America (DGA), and the Producers Guild of America (PGA) would put forth actors, directors, and producers as the key factors — as the late Garry Marshall always said “it comes down to the writing. It’s always about the writing.”

Unlike other guilds, the WGA’s history is preserved in oral history interviews on their website (see link below). The video clips are excellent, but we once had a rare opportunity to publish an interview with the legendary WGA past President Del Reisman (born: April 13, 1924), who died on Jan. 8, 2011.

Although it’s the sixth anniversary of Del Reisman’s death next week, he will live on indefinitely as a chronicler not only of the WGA’s backstory, but of his own parallel path as a “studio brat” from Hollywood’s Golden Era.

This interview is from 2007. He was interviewed by Screenmancer Founder & Exec. Prod., Quendrith Johnson. We’ve included the current Agency List for screenwriters looking for representation as an incentive to read through to the end to discover the whole story of the WGA as we know it today.

DelReisman17

Photo Credit: Joe Rubalcaba

FOREWORD

[WGAw provided this introduction when the interview first appeared.]

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The following is a brief look at the early days of writers’ struggles in the Studio System, and later in the explosive growth of television. Some of these comments are based on frequent conversations with many of the prominent users of studio-owned Underwoods and Royals, during these dynamic days. Del Reisman’s mother, an employee of the great majors, was an additional source of attitude and opinion. Del Reisman himself wrote scripts and story-edited in the last years of the system and in the formative years of television. As a WGAW activist of many years, elected President from 1991-93, he knew the industry in both full shot and close-up.

DEL REISMAN: The Screen Writers Guild was founded in March 1933 at the absolute depths of the depression when America was on its heels. The industry was in turmoil. The studios were all declaring cuts in fees. There was a famous meeting at MGM, which was the giant studio at the time, in which the head of the studio, Louis B. “LB” Mayer, presided. All employees were there: movie stars, grips, everyone. Mayer announced there would be a salary cut of 50 percent. Those earning less then $50 a week would get cut less, and those earning above $50 a week would be cut [back] more. in those days $50 a week was a very livable income. There was a popular star, a great character actor named Wallace Beery sitting in the back, he said: “LB are you going to take the cut too?” And LB said: “Well, no. We plan to restore the cuts in six months.” And Wallace Berry walked out of the meeting.

QUENDRITH JOHNSON: This was really in the swing of the Great Depression. I mean the Stock Market crashed in October 1929, but the general public really felt it hit throughout the 1930’s.

DEL: There were salary cuts all over. Earlier, some of the writers under contract went to see the creative head of MGM, Irving Thalberg. [Thalberg] said: “I can’t do anything about this.” And the writers said: “You raised the regular salaries of the [below-the-line] people on the set. “And Thalberg said: ” Well, they are represented by unions.” The writers left and said: “I think he just told us what to do.” The connection that I make, just a personal reaction, is this — there was a tremendous earthquake in Hollywood [at this time], and it shook down most of Long Beach and Compton — [but] there were faults that came up into this area. A lot of the office buildings downtown lost their decorative statuary and miles away at Hollywood High School, where I attended years later, were, were damaged. There was some death and some injury… terrible property damage. Then a month later the Writers Guild was founded. I always make the connection there were two great shakes of the earth that historic month.

Studio-contract writers, which is to say virtually all screenwriters, joined the new organization, many of them under front-office threats to fail to renew their contracts at option time. A significant number chose not to join, some of them very prominent writers. They formed a rival group, Screen Playwrights. The new Guild was not officially recognized as a bargaining unit by the Federal Government; so the whole thrust of the Guild was to get recognized so they could negotiate with the companies.

In 1938, there was an election held at the old Athletic Club on Sunset. The Guild won over Screen Playwrights, a company-supported group, frequently called a sweetheart union. The Guild thus became the official bargaining unit for the writers, recognized by the Federal Government.

A lot of the members of the Screen Playwrights joined immediately. The job then was to negotiate with the major studios — there was no television.

It took the Screen Writers Guild until 1942, the first big war year, to get their first contract, which was I think was five and a half pages long. (Today, in 2007, it’s close to 500 pages, covering every aspect of writers’ activity, except the new so-called reality shows. [By 2014 the WGA’s Minimum Basic Agreement (MBA) was 671 pages, and is in force until May 1, 2017]).

The one thing they got was the right of the new guild to the exclusive determination of the onscreen writers credit. That was a huge gain. And we still have that. (The companies can recommend what they think the credits should be, but the determination is made by the Guild.) So the founding years were very difficult; there were a lot of writers signed up, and there were only [the] major studios to deal with. There were virtually no independent production companies. And that was the world as it was before TV.

There were a lot of great writers working in those tough years, many of them brilliant. Their work still being studied in film schools throughout the world. To name a few: Ben Hecht, Charles MacArthur, Philip Dunne, Herman Mankiewicz, Lester Cole, John Howard Lawson, Dalton Trumbo, Jules Furthman…

QUENDRITH: What about Lenore Coffee? The other female writer…

DEL: I know who you mean, Mary Pickford’s writing partner.

QUENDRITH: Yes. Frances Marion.

DEL: Right. Frances Marion, Lenore Coffee, Anita Loos. Anita Loos was a very famous writer. Frances Marion was at one time the highest paid screenwriter in Hollywood; she was Mary Pickford’s writing partner.

QUENDRITH: So these big names were behind the crediting process?

DEL: Again, I’m giving you a point of view gathered from many conversations with many writers. I could quote those who believe the system works, and those who believe it should be changed radically; suffice to say, the old system of awarding writing credits was very casual. It was done by the studios. Sometimes the studios would award credit like “well, we owe this guy something” — the proverbial nephew.

In 1942 when the first contract was signed, the contract went for a period of something like three years. That became true for all unions, both above and below-the-line. Negotiations, however, became complicated for all unions when television came in. Coast-to-coast broadcasting was engineered in 1948.

I may be jumping ahead, but I wanted to tell you this: television developed seemingly overnight. All of a sudden, people were staying home and watching whatever was on the tube. They’d see commercials done visually and it was the ‘new medium,’ meaning [audiences] stayed away from the theaters. There was a tremendous reaction from the studios about this. One studio, 20th Century Fox — not related to the present FOX — [in which] the head of the studio was a man named Darryl Zanuck. [He] brought back [a specially designed lens] to America from France in the 1950’s developed by the Ingenue Company, I believe.

The lens became what he [Zanuck] called, or 20th Century Fox called Cinemascope, which projected a widescreen image. Philip Dunne [whose portrait and brief bio adorn the walls of the WGA] wrote the first movie in this new aspect ratio, “The Robe,” based on a best-selling book by Lloyd C. Douglas. It was a big biblical epic. It brought people back into the theaters just to look, and say: “What’s going on here?”

QUENDRITH: It was a different aspect ratio?

DEL: The normal projection was more of a square, so when this came along, it was big. It had a huge curiosity factor. It instituted a lot of widescreen films. People began to return to theaters. But parallel to this, television continued to simply expand. By the time of early 50’s TV audiences were enormous all across the country. There were the two basic networks, NBC and CBS. Then they split off, and ABC was formed. That was the world in which writers functioned. Seven majors and three networks, hardly any independent productions. Then in the mid 50’s, RCA which owned NBC, developed color for television.

QUENDRITH: Where were you in your own career at this time?

DEL: I was working at NBC as a story editor. They developed a show called NBC Matinee Theater that was done in color. It sounds incredible now, but there were 5 shows a week, 1 hour. It was an anthology of new stories. It was in NY and here, but it was shot here in Los Angeles. NBC opened its new studios in Burbank, which they still have, to accommodate everything they were doing.

QUENDRITH: So it must have skewed female?

DEL: Not only that, but it gave the appliance places something to show in the middle of the day. You’d walk past a window full of TVs and see color televisions.

QUENDRITH: And their advertisers?

DEL: Exactly. I think Matinee went on the air in ’54 or ’55. It was on the air two or three years. I was on the very first GI bill at the end of the war. How I get there, how I ended up in the new ‘medium.’ When I was discharged, honorably discharged. I went to UC Berkeley on the GI bill and kind of rushed through. I found it very difficult to adjust [back to civilian life] — I was a bomdardier in a B17. If you ever say the movie “The Best Years of Our Lives”? Dana Andrews went into the nose — that’s it. These planes were prop-driven. No jets. So I flew 35 missions.

QUENDRITH: Did you go into the Pacific Theater of Operations?

DEL: No, just the “ETO,” the European Theater of Operations. The name of the outfit was the 381st Heavy Bombardment Group, Eighth Air Force. France was occupied by Germany. We bombed some targets in occupied France, but most if it was Germany itself. The Ruhr Valley with Essen and Dusseldorf , Cologne — that was the manufacturing world. I went to Berlin six times. I can tell you that was not fun…

QUENDRITH: It was complete devastation, I’m sure…

DEL: They lost a lot. We lost a lot of planes. We went as far as Munich and in the north, Hamburg, Peenemunde, where they launched the V-2s over London.

QUENDRITH: May I segue by saying Hollywood and its politics must have been lightweight compared to that?

DEL: Hollywood was nothing compared to that, because nobody was shooting at you. I didn’t come home to become a writer. I had no interest in it. But I thought that somehow, I’d become a part of the studio system. Maybe film editing, maybe camera. I was a studio brat. My younger sister and I were studio brats. My mother was a secretary at the old Universal Studios (Carl Laemmle and all that). We used to, as little kids, go out to see her at Universal, at her office. The family story is an old Depression story… my father kind of took off — so she was it, she was the income for us. If Universal went bankrupt, that was always being threatened there would be nothing for us. You know that the secretaries in those days knew everything that happens and was about to happen. My mother was the production unit’s contact with the Breen office, later the Shurlock office, the administrators of the code. She took down their problems and passed them on to a very angry studio.

My kid sister and I would frequently be on set. They would allow kids on set, if they shut up. The grips, everyone at the studio, had the same problem: kids, baby-sitters cost money. My mother was a member of the SOEG (Screen Office Employee Guild). So the Executive Director was Herbert K. Sorrell. All we did as kids was go in the back row [during SOEG meetings]. There were chairs there; the kids would just flake out and sleep. Usually were a dozen or more children there. SOEG was a guild. A wild union. Years later, after the war, Herb Sorrell, executive director of the union, wrote his autobiography. He had fought hard for the below-the-line people in the industry. He identified himself as a Communist.

QUENDRITH: We’ll lead into the Black List from here.

DEL: Let me leap ahead to the Black List. I was on the Guild’s Black List credits committee.Our job was to check to see the identities of the real writers behind the fronts or pseudonyms. We began this process trying to cut through the fog of memory and the series of obfuscations by the studios. That started in 1996 and went up to 1999/2000.

QUENDRITH: Paul Jarrico, he was one —

DEL: Exactly. Paul Jarrico, and my friend George Kirgo. Both are deceased.

QUENDRITH: Were you ever on the Black List?

DEL: I was never on the black list, and neither was George. But we were both young writers working in the Blacklist years — that tragic time. Well, it left its mark on everyone. It lasted 15 years. Some of those denied work (under their own names) were struggling for the full 15 years. Sure, some were Communists. The Guild’s first President, John Howard Lawson, he is remembered as the first, but he was actually the second President of the new Screen Writers Guild in 1933. People knew of his politics — did I mention the name Lester Cole?

QUENDRITH: Right, the writer?

DEL: Yes, he was a Communist. As were others of great talent and great determination to create and develop the Guild. There was not a great love of their politics across the unions or from Hollywood — most just found them difficult in labor union matters because they were so well organized they controlled meetings by legal parliamentary proceedings. The writers who were around then spoke angrily of their maneuvering, but the Guild was a First Amendment organization above all.

QUENDRITH: So they had political agenda already not connected with anything to do with Hollywood?

DEL: Yes, essentially support of the Soviet Union. Actually, this was before the war, or at least the entrance into war.

QUENDRITH: What an incredible mix of issues for the country and Hollywood!

DEL: I want to mention this date. In 1954 when all of this was developing, the Guild merged with the Television Writers of America, and merged with the Radio Writers Guild of New York and Los Angeles. So that was [this] merger, and under a new name [that is] now Writers Guild of America.

QUENDRITH: Are New York and LA autonomous? If not, which is the controlling body? Or is there a controlling entity?

DEL: For various corporate reasons, there were actually new corporations formed, Writers Guild West and Writers Guild East. Hollywood was the center of moviemaking at the studios. New York, with all of its history in live television, had been the center of TV.

But with the major studios getting into TV, the New York group had fewer and fewer people to represent because writers literally moved here physically.

QUENDRITH: Who is the final arbiter?

DEL: That’s a good question. The leadership is separate, so they have their board and their special needs. For example, in New York they represent many newswriters, so they have special needs. And we [WGA West] continue to represent mostly TV writers, animation writers, and screenwriters because of the huge amount of activity that continues here. Face-to-face meetings, despite email, faxing, even teleconferencing, continue to be critical.

QUENDRITH: Amidst all the technology and other changes, are the majors retaining their loyalty to Hollywood? What I mean is, to clarify, is LA still the magnet for the decision makers in the industry? Is there loyalty to the area, the concept of “Hollywood” as a physical location and a symbolic icon of the industry?

DEL: If you have runaway production with major studios making films anywhere where it is cheaper, literally the Balkans, Bulgaria, Romania, etc. — that means that they are made without our labor union contracts, without labor union protection or [with] different labor union protection.

QUENDRITH: How about all the productions that went to Canada?

DEL: There was so much shooting in Canada because of the currency exchange. The protections can be avoided — like the Black Dahlia story —

QUENDRITH: The recent one with Hilary Swank?

DEL: Yes. I’m pretty sure that was made in Bulgaria. They made the sets, everything; they did not have to pay the standard fees. It is cheaper. To answer your question, they film there because [production costs] are cheaper. And our city, L.A., doesn’t look like the L.A. of the 30’s, 40’s, and 50’s, not anymore.

QUENDRITH: What is the net effect on the psyche of the industry — is there still loyalty in LA to Hollywood?

DEL: My mother at the old Universal wouldn’t recognize the industry today. Announcements in the trades would baffle her, because there are four or five production entities.

QUENDRITH: They split the costs?

DEL: Right, they split the cost. So the financial partners that split the cost are as much involved as the studio. The authority has changed a lot. Who runs the movie has changed a lot.

QUENDRITH: How does that affect the writers?

DEL: You have many bosses. You will get attitudes and opinions from a number of the financial sources. I don’t think there is any history of them giving notes — “Do this on page 14” — but they wouldn’t put money in unless the project was in good hands [as far as] writers, producers, directors, actors. The only reason they would put money in is “we want more action adventure” — otherwise they won’t put money in.

If it is a big Will Ferrell comedy — “We want big laughs or we won’t put money in.” Well, maybe they leave Will Ferrell alone. Apparently, he can do no wrong.

They have to be secure that it is the film they want, that wherever they are from, they get the movie they want. Take “Mission Impossible: 3,” they pretty much know what kind of movie it will be [with Tom Cruise]. They know the nature of the film they are making.

QUENDRITH: The regular machinery of Hollywood, how writers and actors and directors work, is changing as fast as the technology almost. Non-traditional arrangements are everywhere in the business now.

DEL: I’m thinking of Philip Dunne right now. Phil wrote the terrific screenplay for “How Green Was My Valley” — I think that was ’41, maybe ’40. He had one boss, Zanuck. Then both he and Zanuck sat down with the director, John Ford, and the star, a 12-year-old Roddy McDowall. They made the picture, not layers of authority, not tons of notes.

QUENDRITH: Where is your life now as a writer?

DEL: I’m still in the game. And I’ve been teaching for the last twelve years at AFI.

QUENDRITH: Are you writing a book about your experiences, the history of the business from your POV?

DEL: Up to now, I say no. I’m not writing a book.

QUENDRITH: You are saving that for old age?

DEL: We’ll see.

Del never finished the book he was working on, but he’d have approved of the list below — as promised. He’d be happy to know Will Ferrell has made a few bombs by now, and while Tom Cruise still commands box office results overseas, at home things are different. Because every new audience needs new storytellers, and there can’t be any storytellers without the stories. So in 2017, for those of you with screenwriting aspirations, here’s the WGA’s list of agents. Don’t bother them unless you’ve written something outstanding, have already placed in the Nicholl Fellowship, or are seeking a new agent. But mostly, keep your New Year’s Resolution for 2017 to keep writing.

We took out the phone number contacts, which can only be found at the WGAw website. Here’s a link for the WGA List, also the WGA Oral History project.

THE AGENCY LIST

Above The Line Agency
468 N Camden Dr
Ste 200
Beverly Hills, CA 90210

Agency For The Performing Arts
405 S Beverly Dr
Beverly Hills, CA 90212

Allensworth Entertainment, Inc.
433 N Camden Dr Fl 4
Beverly Hills, CA 90210-4408

Alpern Group, The
15645 Royal Oak Rd
Encino, CA 91436

American Media Artists
4830 Encino Ave
Encino, CA 91316

Annette Van Duren Agency
3810 Wilshire Blvd #1906
Los Angeles, CA 90010-3223

Avail Talent
2990 Grace Lane
Costa Mesa, CA 92626

Beth Bohn Management Inc
2658 Griffith Park Blvd
Ste 508
Los Angeles, CA 90039

BiCoastal Talent & Literary Agency
2600 W Olive Ave Ste 500
Burbank, CA 91505-4572

Bobby Ball Talent Agency
3500 W Olive Ave Ste 300
Burbank, CA 91505-4647

Brady, Brannon & Rich
5670 Wilshire Blvd Ste 820
Los Angeles, CA 90036-5613

Brant Rose Agency
6671 Sunset Blvd
Ste 1584 B
Los Angeles, CA 90028

Brogan Agency
1517 Park Row
Venice, CA 90291

Candace Lake Agency, Inc.
1072 Laurel Ln
Pebble Beach, CA 93953-3112

Career Artists International
11030 Ventura Blvd #3
Studio City, CA 91604

Cavaleri & Associates
3500 W Olive Ave Ste 300
Burbank, CA 91505-4647

Chasin Agency, Inc.
8899 Beverly Blvd
Ste 716
Los Angeles, CA 90048

Contemporary Artists, Ltd.
610 Santa Monica Blvd
Ste 202
Santa Monica, CA 90401

CAA: Creative Artists Agency, LLC
2000 Ave Of The Stars
Los Angeles, CA 90067

Criterion
4842 Sylmar Ave
Sherman Oaks, CA 91423-1716

David Shapira & Associates
193 N Robertson Blvd
Beverly Hills, CA 90211

Don Buchwald & Associates
6500 Wilshire Blvd
Ste 2200
Los Angeles, CA 90048

Dravis Agency, The
4370 Tujunga Ave
Ste 145
Studio City, CA 91604

Equitable Stewardship for Artists
6363 Wilshire Blvd Ste 650
Los Angeles, CA 90048-5725

Featured Artists Agency
8844 W Olympic Blvd Ste 200
Beverly Hills, CA 90211-3623

Gersh Agency, Inc.
9465 Wilshire Blvd Fl 6
Beverly Hills, CA 90212-2605

Global Talent Agency
2615 W Magnolia Blvd
Ste 101
Burbank, CA 91505

Grant, Savic, Kopaloff & Associates
6399 Wilshire Blvd
Ste 414
Los Angeles, CA 90048

Gregory David Mayo Representing the Performing Arts
10061 Riverside Dr # 242
Toluca Lake, CA 91602-2560

Hollywood View Agency
5255 Veronica St
Los Angeles, CA 90008

ICM Partners
10250 Constellation Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90067

Innovative Artists
1505 Tenth St
Santa Monica, CA 90401

Irv Schechter Company
9460 Wilshire Blvd
Ste 300
Beverly Hills, CA 90212

Jack Lenny Associates
9454 Wilshire Blvd
Ste 600
Beverly Hills, CA 90212

Jim Preminger Agency
10866 Wilshire Blvd
10th Floor
Los Angeles, CA 90024

JKA Talent & Literary Agency
12725 Ventura Blvd
Studio City, CA 91604

Kaplan Stahler Agency
8383 Wilshire Blvd
Ste 923
Beverly Hills, CA 90211

Kathleen Schultz Associates
6442 Coldwater Cyn
Ste 117
Valley Glen, CA 91606

Larchmont Literary Agency
444 N Larchmont Blvd
Ste 200
Los Angeles, CA 90004

Laya Gelff Agency
16133 Ventura Blvd
Ste 700
Encino, CA 91436

Lenhoff & Lenhoff
830 Palm Ave
W Hollywood, CA 90069

Lisa Callamaro Literary Agency
427 N Canon Dr
Ste 202
Beverly Hills, CA 90210

Lynne & Reilly Agency
10725 Vanowen Street
Ste 113
North Hollywood, CA 91605

Maggie Roiphe Agency
1721 S Garth Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90035

Media Artists Group
8222 Melrose Ave Fl 2
Los Angeles, CA 90046-6825

Metropolitan Talent Agency
5405 Wilshire Blvd Ste 218
Los Angeles, CA 90036-4203

Michael Lewis & Associates
2506 Fifth Street
Ste 100
Santa Monica, CA 90405

Mitchell K. Stubbs & Associates
8695 W Washington Blvd
Ste 204
Culver City, CA 90232

Nancy Chaidez Agency
6340 Coldwater Cyn
Ste 214
North Hollywood, CA 91606

Natural Talent, Inc.
3331 Ocean Park Blvd
Ste 203
Santa Monica, CA 90405

Pantheon
1801 Century Park East
Ste 1910
Los Angeles, CA 90067

Paradigm
360 N Crescent Dr
North Bldg
Beverly Hills, CA 90210

Paul Kohner, Inc.
9300 Wilshire Blvd
Ste 555
Beverly Hills, CA 90212

Preferred Artists
16633 Ventura Blvd
Ste 1421
Encino, CA 91436

Rebel Entertainment Partners, Inc.
5700 Wilshire Blvd
Ste 456
Los Angeles, CA 90036

Rothman Brecher Agency
9250 Wilshire Blvd
Penthouse
Beverly Hills, CA 90212

RPM Talent
2600 W Olive Ave
5th Floor
Burbank, CA 91505

Sarnoff Company, Inc., The
1600 Rosecrans Avenue
Media Center, 4th Floor
Manhattan Beach, CA 90266

Savage Agency, The
6212 Banner Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90038-2802

Silver Bitela Agency
6612 Pacheco Way
Citrus Hts, CA 95610

Stars, The Agency
23 Grant Ave 4th Fl
San Francisco, CA 94108

Starwil Prods Talent Agency
433 N Camden Dr 4th Fl
Beverly Hills, CA 90210

Stein Agency, The
5125 Oakdale Ave
Woodland Hills, CA 91364

Stuart M. Miller Co, The
11684 Ventura Blvd
Ste 225
Studio City, CA 91604

Suite A Management Talent & Literary Agency
136 El Camino Dr Ste 202
Beverly Hills, CA 90212-2705

Summit Talent & Literary Agency
9454 Wilshire Blvd
Ste 203
Beverly Hills, CA 90212

United Talent Agency, Inc.
UTA Plaza
9336 Civic Center Drive
Beverly Hills, CA 90210

Nerve Talent & Literary Agency LLC
6310 San Vicente Blvd Ste 100
Los Angeles, CA 90048-5498

Warden Group, The
PO Box 1595
Beverly Hills, CA 90213-1595

William Kerwin Agency
1605 N Cahuenga Blvd
Ste 202
Hollywood, CA 90028

Wilson & Associates
5482 Wilshire Blvd Ste 175
Los Angeles, CA 90036-4218

WME Entertainment
9601 Wilshire Blvd 3rd Fl
Beverly Hills, CA 90210

This original interview can be found in its entirety here. The 2017 Writers Guild Awards take place in LA and NY on Sunday, Feb. 19, 2017, see www.wga.org for details.

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SCREENMANCER is a gathering place for people who make movies and people making a lot of first drafts trying to make movies.

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