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Joan Kron’s TAKE MY NOSE…PLEASE! is Kinda Fonda Plastic Surgery

By Bill Scheft, Screenmancer Correspondent

SCREENMANCER presents 89-year-old journalist Joan Kron’s  first film, “TAKE MY NOSE….PLEASE!” This award-winning documentary about female comedians and plastic surgery begins its limited theatrical run in New York October 6 at the Village East and in Los Angeles October 13 at the Laemmle Santa Monica. She sat down for Screenmancer and talked with former Letterman writer Bill Scheft, the executive producer of the film, who also happens to be her cousin.

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SM: WHAT IS THE FILM YOU SET OUT TO MAKE, AND WHAT IS THE FILM THAT TURNED OUT?

JOAN: I set out to make a film about the importance of female comedians and their honesty about plastic surgery. But the honesty was so affecting, I never expected they would inspire so much empathy. Comedians always inspire laughter, rarely empathy. The fact that the audience became so attached to the two main characters (comedians Jackie Hoffman and Emily Askin) and that they would embody so many of the feelings that real women had about plastic surgery, that ended up being the charm of the movie.

That was the biggest surprise in making the film. The second biggest surprise was I never realized I was such a control freak.

SM: DID YOUR 40-YEAR CAREER AS A PRINT JOURNALIST HELP YOUR TECHNIQUE AS A DOCUMENTARIAN?

JOAN: I think that if you don’t try to entrap the people you’re interviewing, to try and get them to say what you want them to say, just let them talk, they open up and then the honesty takes over.

In many interviews, I felt I had asked a question and didn’t have to ask anything for ten minutes. Aaron Latham, a wonderful writer who I worked with at New York Magazine, once explained his interview technique to me. He said that when people stop talking, there’s a long pause, and they hate the silence so they need to fill it. That’s when the truth comes out. So, I had to keep my trap shut, which is extremely difficult for me. The days I did that were some of the best filming days.

SM: WHAT JOURNALISTIC ADVANTAGES DOES FILM HAVE OVER PRINT?

JOAN: It is a huge advantage for a filmmaker to be a writer. Even though you don’t have to write any of the connective tissue, you’re writing all the time. 100-word synopsis. A 200-word synopsis. A 1000-word synopsis. You have to articulate the film on paper. All this happens before you shoot. At the moment of filming, all you have to do is ask good questions.

SM: WHAT IS THE MOST PRACTICAL PIECE OF ADVICE YOU CAN GIVE TO SOMEONE MAKING THEIR FIRST FILM?

JOAN: Get a lawyer before you do anything else. Buy a dozen good pens and three large binders. Buy plastic covers for important papers. Get a graphic logo for your movie made early. When you’re shooting, make sure someone shoots you so you have some publicity shots. Get thank you notes made to send with checks. This is important, because many of the checks you’ll write could have and should have been larger.

SM: JANE FONDA GLARED AT MEGYN KELLY LAST WEEK BECAUSE SHE DARED MENTION HER PLASTIC SURGERY. WAS IT BECAUSE IT’S NOBODY’S BUSINESS OR BECAUSE IT WAS IN FRONT OF ROBERT REDFORD ?

JOAN: I think it definitely had something to do with Robert Redford. He has been outspoken against plastic surgery. And everyone wants his approval. Jane has been very courageous and outspoken about the work she’s had, even mentioning her doctor on her website. Years ago, she went out to promote a new movie and it ended up being a facelift press tour. But you want to talk about it when you want to talk about it, and maybe she didn’t feel it was appropriate. I will say, Robert Redford looked quite good. Not as rumpled as usual. Maybe it was just good make-up. Maybe it was something else. Perhaps she was being considerate of him.

Bill Scheft & Joan Kron at Miami Film Festival.

Bill Scheft & Joan Kron at Miami Film Festival.

SM: DID THE EXPERIENCE OF MAKING THE FILM CHANGE YOUR FEELINGS ABOUT THE SUBJECT MATTER, OR SOLIDIFY THEM?

JOAN: I don’t think it changed my feelings about plastic surgery. I had very strong feelings when I started. I had never been moved by anything I saw about plastic surgery. People were always looking at either the horror aspect or the extremes. They viewed it as something to make fun of.  I never felt anyone in the media had any empathy. They were just going for the bizarre.

I call it the “Ain’t that awful?” approach. “Ain’t that awful she wanted her lips so big?”

And I had my own experience with plastic surgery. The feeling of looking in the mirror afterward and seeing the magic. Seeing that I looked better.

People do not go through the pain, expense and risk without a benefit. It’s a $13 billion industry. People don’t endure the jokes and criticism without getting something for it. We don’t all look like Jocelyn Wildenstein. Why do people need a car? To get from her to there. Why do women need a facelift? Same answer. No one ever complimented anyone on looking worse.

SM: WAS THERE A DOCUMENTARY THAT INFLUENCED YOU FOR THE LOOK AND EXECUTION OF YOUR FILM?

JOAN: I was mostly influenced by the type of films I didn’t want to make. I didn’t want to make what I call a “seven-sofa documentary.” Seven talking heads on seven different couches. And what happened was people became so attached to Jackie and Emily they forgot it was documentary and began to think of it as a dramatic movie.

SM: WHAT WAS SURPRISING ABOUT AUDIENCE REACTION SO FAR?

JOAN: By the end, the audience is not only empathizing, it’s identifying. So many times, women come up to me after the film and give me the famous facelift gesture (pushing their cheeks up underneath their ears). “What do you think?” they say. I feel there is something magical about plastic surgery, and inside every one of us there is hope for magic.

SM: DID YOU WAIT TOO LONG TO MAKE YOUR FIRST FILM, OR JUST RIGHT?

I started five and a half years ago, and I was worried throughout the process that I wouldn’t live to see it finished. Now, I just want to make it to Friday. (October 6, when the film makes its theatrical debut in New York .)

BILL SCHEFT was a writer for David Letterman from 1991-2015, during which time he was nominated for 15 Emmys. He is the author of four novels and was a finalist for the Thurber Prize for American Humor. He and his late wife, comedian Adrianne Tolsch, were the Executive Producers of TAKE MY NOSE…PLEASE! The film is in her memory.

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ON THE NOSE, QUICK FILM FACTS & DETAILS

Joan Kron, veteran journalist, spent the past 25 years as contributing editor-at-large at Allure magazine where she covered the hot topics of cosmetic dermatology and plastic surgery. Prior to Allure, she held senior editorial positions at New York Magazine, The New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Avenue Magazine. Kron is known for her books and numerous articles and commentary on design, beauty and plastic surgery. And now at the age of 89 years old, she has embarked on a new career as a documentary filmmaker.

WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT

TAKE MY NOSE PLEASE is a seriously funny and wickedly subversive look at the role comedy has played in exposing the pressures on women to be attractive and society’s desire/shame relationship with plastic surgery. More than 15 million cosmetic procedures were performed in the US in 2014. And 90% of them on were done on women. Yet, for those who elect to tinker with Mother Nature, especially for high-profile women, plastic surgery is still a very dark secret. Funny women, though, are the exception. From Phyllis Diller and Joan Rivers to Roseanne Barr and Kathy Griffin, comedians have been unashamed to talk about their perceived flaws, and the steps taken to remedy them. For these dames, cosmetic surgery isn’t vanity, it is affirmative action – compensation for the unfair distribution of youthfulness and beauty.

By admitting what their sisters in drama deny, comic performers speak to women who feel the same pressures, giving them permission to pursue change (or not to) while entertaining us.

TAKE MY NOSE PLEASE follows two comedians as they deliberate about going under the knife. Emily Askin, an up-and coming improv performer, has always wanted her nose refined. Jackie Hoffman, a seasoned headliner on Broadway and on TV, considers herself ugly and regrets not having the nose job offered in her teens. And maybe she’d like a face-lift, as well. As we follow their surprisingly emotional stories, we meet other who have taken the leap – or held out.

Putting it all in perspective are psychologists, sociologists, the medical community and cultural critics. And for comic relief and the profundity only comedians can supply. The film includes commentary from Roseanne Barr, Phyllis Diller, the late Joan Rivers,Judy Gold, Julie Halston, Lisa Lampanelli, Giulia Rozzi, Bill Scheft, and Adrianne Tolsch.

FESTIVALS AND AWARDS
Audience Award – Miami International Film Festival
Audience Award – Berkshire International Film Festival
Official Selection – Newport Beach International Film Festival; San Francisco Doc Fest; Arizona International Film Festival; Middlebury New Filmmakers Festival; San Luis Obispo Film Festival; Martha’s Vineyard International Film Festival; and more

SOCIAL

See this debut film from someone 89-years-young. Joan Kron’s TAKE MY NOSE… PLEASE! Opens Oct. 6 in New York and Oct. 13 in LA.
#GoTuckYourself on Twitter or Face(lift)book & find website here!

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LA LA LAND for Shoes, That’s FOOTNOTES Plus a Social Message

by Quendrith Johnson, Los Angeles Correspondent

Damien Chazelle should be thrilled that his movie LA LA LAND has joined the serious ranks of American films that have opened up global audiences to a renewed appreciation of singing and dancing films. The proof? French film FOOTNOTES, originally titled “Sur Quel Pied Danser,” that “opens” on VOD, Tues. Sept. 19. Although the press notes assure all that its inspiration comes from the movies of Jacques Demy and Stanley Donen of “Singing in The Rain” fame, you’ll be tempted to add Chazelle to what influenced this quirky movie.

FOOTNOTES was actually made before LA LA LAND, although without the smash success of Chazelle’s movie, this one would have a hard time finding an audience. Even harder since this footwear all-singing, all-dancing saga is a message movie.

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What’s the message? FOOTNOTES is so floaty and campy, you’ll have to see it yourself, but basically it’s about job security in the age of outsourcing.

That and the usual “don’t hate your life, follow your dreams.”

But woven in here is a power similar to LA LA LAND’s ability to elevate ordinary lives into something extraordinary. Except, since this is coming out of France, the Socialist sleight of hand swaps Tinseltown for shoe business with Pauline Etienne as Julie, our fleet-footed heroine.

She’s not Emma Stone, but she has an authentic off-center, human (non-actory) quality in common with her American counterpart.

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The way Monument Releasing describes this film is priceless because it puts a glossy spin on essentially a factory worker walk-out that would only be a drama in America.
“Julie (is) a young woman struggling to make ends meet in France’s radically changing economy. Living out of a backpack, Julie spends her days jumping from job to job until she’s finally offered a temporary stockroom position at a women’s luxury shoe factory. After making friends with the boss’s spunky receptionist Sophie and the ever-charming factory truck driver Samy, Julie thinks the hard times are behind her. But Julie’s dreams of stability collapse when management threatens to close down the factory. As her intrepid group of female colleagues get together to go on strike, Samy and the other truck drivers decide to side with the company’s scheming CEO. Julie must choose whether to keep a low profile (and a shot at permanent employment) or to resist and fight back on the picket line.”
There’s major shoe porn throughout this whole protest-driven, fair-employment plot. Opera pumps, mules, shiny flats, slip-ons, skids, sneakers, loafers, stilettoes, made of nubuck, crocodile, suede, patent leather, you name it. Even when the picketers shack up in tents, they vow to solve their problems in magical red shoes, hand-made women’s oxfords. Yet, it’s about a labor dispute whereby all these workers will be replaced by their cheaper Chinese counterparts. A global message really, with hot relevancy and a Kali, the many-armed Indian goddess, look to the official poster.

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But this isn’t NORMA RAE, the 1979 Sally Field starrer where she fights for her rights, nor is it a labor party anthem. It’s kind of a coming-of-age story through the lens of a Chazelle sensibility, a worldview that underscores how everyday life is our life, and how even being stuck in a wrong job or on a picket line or in a life rut is really the exciting plot of our lives. Add a little singing and carefully choreographed sashaying in street clothes — and you’re in a post-Studio Musical, musical.
As this movie foreshadows LA LA LAND, it also plays with its own ending in the unresolved-resolve. Without giving FOOTNOTES away, it’s a movie to watch on many different levels. It’s a diversion, and a parallel universe escape hatch from work where labor disputes can even have a melody written for the strife.
Watch FOOTNOTES Sept. 19 on most major platforms including iTunes, Amazon, Comcast, Charter, Cox, Vimeo, and various other cable operators.

Catch a Glimpse in Advance…

MONUMENT RELEASING PRESENTS

FOOTNOTES Helmer & Cast
Directed by: Paul Calori and Kostia Testut
Starring: Pauline Etienne, Olivier Chantreau, François Morel, Loïc Corbery
and Julie Victor

Official Selection of Palm Springs International Film Festival, Minneapolis St. Paul International Film Festival, Filmfest DC and many more; visit the French Allocine site here.

Opens on VOD Nationwide on Tuesday, Sept. 19 on all major platforms including iTunes, Amazon, Comcast, Charter, Cox, Vimeo, and various other cable operators.

France, 85 Minutes, In French with English Subtitles

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Crazy Little Thing Called DOWNSIZING from Payne with Damon, Wiig, Waltz & Hong Chau

by Quendrith Johnson, Los Angeles Correspondent

For everybody who loved the DESCENDANTS with George Clooney, but thought it was too sad, or loved SIDEWAYS with Paul Giamatt but not that comedic mean streak of Alexander Payne, here comes something to really love.

It’s called DOWNSIZING from Paramount, directed by Payne and co-written with Jim Taylor. This new comedy stars Matt Damon, Christoph Waltz, Kristen Wiig and Hong Chau from INHERENT VICE.

If it sounds like “Honey, I Shrunk the Kids,” it’s not. Actually everything gets fractionalized here. The tagline is “a big world is waiting.”

Unlike Jonathan Swift’s “Modest Proposal” this is a more practical approach to world over-population. Imagine everything at 5 inches to say 72 inch scale, or way smaller than you are right now.

But don’t get lost in the math or dubious physics of this movie, because the miniaturized world looks spectacular. And it’s a fantastic alternative to Agenda 21, the alleged United Nations plan for depopulating the earth. (What? Google it up. Scary.)

But First a Tiny Peak at DOWNSIZING

Meanwhile, it’s a small world after all in Alexander Payne’s brilliant rendition of what happens when big ideas turn regular-sized people into scale-model minds on a grand tableau.

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DOWNSIZING just unspooled this week at Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), plus these photos prove the great cast chemistry.

Paramount’s Official Small Print on This Movie

Downsizing imagines what might happen if, as a solution to over-population, Norwegian scientists discover how to shrink humans to five inches tall and propose a 200-year global transition from big to small. People soon realize how much further money goes in a miniaturized world, and with the promise of a better life, everyman Paul Safranek (Matt Damon) and wife Audrey (Kristen Wiig) decide to abandon their stressed lives in Omaha in order to get small and move to a new downsizedcommunity — a choice that triggers life-changing adventures.

A big world may be waiting, but everyone was their Actual Size at TIFF.

Directed by: Alexander Payne

Starring: Matt Damon, Christoph Waltz, Hong Chau and Kristen Wiig

Written by: Alexander Payne & Jim Taylor

Produced by: Mark Johnson, Alexander Payne, Jim Taylor.

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Facebook: /DownsizingFilm

Twitter: @DownsizingFilm, Instagram: @Downsizing, DownsizingMovie.com (refers to Facebook)

DOWNSIZING is in theaters December 22, “a big world is waiting.” See you in five inches. Hashtag? #Downsizing.

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DADDY’S HOME 2: Mel’s Like Team Spirit, That’s Gibson, Wahlberg, Ferrell & Lithgow

by Quendrith Johnson, Los Angeles Correspondent

Mel Gibson comes back from traffic court, lol, okay too soon. Mulligan. Mel Gibson comes back from his Hollywood resurrection this year with his six-pack Oscar-nominated movie HACKSAW RIDGE (2016), that won two Oscars for sound mixing and editing, to join son of anarchy Mark Wahlberg and deviant nice guy Will Ferrell in DADDY’S HOME 2, their hit franchise reteam.

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But he’s not alone in the father-figure star power value-add. Beloved veteran actor John Lithgow joins the onscreen DNA party too. And there’s sidekick John Cena, who recently made a heartfelt video that truly inspires people to ‘never give up,’ and even makes you forget who the sponsor is, seriously.  So, expect the best here as this foursome looks promising plot-wise.

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This movie drops Nov. 10 from Paramount, but it’s never too soon to get a good laugh at the Old Man’s expense, even if it’s just an onscreen version of Pops. Because? “This November, it’s every daddy for himself,” as the studio teases the trailer.

Here’s a Look Into DADDY’S HOME 2

Paramount Puts It This Way…

In the sequel to the 2015 global smash, father and stepfather, Dusty (Mark Wahlberg) and Brad (Will Ferrell) have joined forces to provide their kids with the perfect Christmas. Their newfound partnership is put to the test when Dusty’s old-school, macho Dad (Mel Gibson) and Brad’s ultra-affectionate and emotional Dad (John Lithgow) arrive just in time to throw the holiday into complete chaos.

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Directed by: Sean Anders
Star Cast: Will Ferrell, Mark Wahlberg, Linda Cardellini, John Cena, John Lithgow & Mel Gibson

DADDY’S HOME 2 – Not Love But Social Handles
#DaddysHome2
Facebook: /daddyshomemovie
Twitter: @daddyshome
Instagram: @daddyshomemovie

Again, DADDY’s HOME 2 is in theaters November 10 from Paramount.

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